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Did you Know? There is a cure for FIP!


FIP treatment might soon be a reality

In 2016 Cornell Feline Hospital released research data:

"We are excited about the results of a recent study investigating the use of an antiviral drug to treat cats with Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP), an almost routinely fatal disease of cats for which there is currently no cure.

Researchers at Kansas State University, Wichita State University, and the University of California, Davis administered the drug XXX to eight cats infected with FIP. Of the eight, six survived. Laboratory tests showed improvements in a number of indicators of disease that corresponded with the clinical improvement of these cats. The results suggest that XXX inhibits the virus from replicating (creating new viruses) in infected cats, and that it is relatively safe at the tested dosages.

While a great deal of work still needs to be done, these results are encouraging, and provide hope for the possibility of a viable treatment for this dreadful disease of cats."

Yunjeong Kim ,Hongwei Liu,Anushka C. Galasiti Kankanamalage,Sahani Weerasekara,Duy H. Hua,William C. Groutas,Kyeong-Ok Chang,Niels C. Pedersen

Published: March 30, 2016https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1005531

Now in 2020 Pedersen's report states a new medication that cures FIP. "FIP is not a death sentence"

The Atlantic recently reported on Pedersen's groundbreaking results: GS-441524 successfully cured naturally occurring FIP in 25 out of 31 cats in a field trial—“an unheard-of recovery rate.” Developed by pharmaceutical company Gilead Sciences, GS-441524 defeats viruses by blocking their ability to replicate.Jun 17, 2020

GS-441524

Purity ≥99.5% Concentration 17mg/m

https://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article?id=10.1371/journal.ppat.1005531#abstract0


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